snicker

I
(New American Roget's College Thesaurus)
v. i. snigger, titter, laugh, giggle, chuckle; ridicule.
II
(Roget's IV) n.
Syn. giggle, titter, snigger; see laugh .
See Synonym Study at laugh . v.
Syn. giggle, titter, snigger; see laugh .
III
(Roget's 3 Superthesaurus)
I
n.
snigger, snort, sniggle, giggle, laugh, chuckle, suppressed laugh. see laugh
II
v.
snigger, snort, sniggle, giggle, laugh, chuckle, titter, suppress a laugh, teehee. see laugh
IV
(Roget's Thesaurus II) I verb 1. To laugh in a stifled way: giggle, snigger, titter. See LAUGHTER. 2. To smile or laugh scornfully or derisively: fleer, sneer, snigger. Idiom: curl one's lip. See EXPRESS, LAUGHTER, RESPECT. II noun 1. A stifled laugh: giggle, snigger, titter. See LAUGHTER. 2. A facial expression or laugh conveying scorn or derision: fleer, sneer, snigger. See EXPRESS, LAUGHTER, RESPECT.

English dictionary for students. 2013.

Synonyms:
(under restraint), , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • snicker — [snik′ər] vi. [echoic] 1. to laugh in a sly or derisive, partly stifled manner 2. to neigh; nicker vt. to utter with a snicker n. a sly or derisive, partly stifled laugh SYN. LAUGH snickeringly adv …   English World dictionary

  • Snicker — Snick er, n. A half suppressed, broken laugh. [Written also {snigger}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Snicker — Snick er, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Snickered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Snickering}.] [Cf. D. snikken to sob, to sigh.] [Written also {snigger}.] 1. To laugh slyly; to laugh in one s sleeve. [1913 Webster] 2. To laugh with audible catches of voice, as when… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • snicker — index mock (deride) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • snicker — (v.) 1690s, possibly of imitative origin, similar to Du. snikken to gasp, sob. Related: Snickered; snickering. The noun is first recorded 1836, from the verb …   Etymology dictionary

  • snicker — ► VERB 1) snigger. 2) (of a horse) whinny. ► NOUN ▪ an act or sound of snickering. ORIGIN imitative …   English terms dictionary

  • snicker — UK [ˈsnɪkə(r)] / US [ˈsnɪkər] verb [intransitive] Word forms snicker : present tense I/you/we/they snicker he/she/it snickers present participle snickering past tense snickered past participle snickered 1) if a horse snickers, it makes a low… …   English dictionary

  • snicker — snick|er [ˈsnıkə US ər] v [Date: 1600 1700; Origin: From the sound] [i]AmE to laugh quietly and in a way that is not nice at something which is not supposed to be funny British Equivalent: sniggersnicker at ▪ The other students snickered at Steve …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • snicker — [[t]snɪ̱kə(r)[/t]] snickers, snickering, snickered VERB If you snicker, you laugh quietly in a disrespectful way, for example at something rude or embarrassing. [V at n] We all snickered at Mrs. Swenson. [Also V] Syn: snigger N COUNT Snicker is… …   English dictionary

  • snicker — snickeringly, adv. /snik euhr/, v.i. 1. to laugh in a half suppressed, indecorous or disrespectful manner. v.t. 2. to utter with a snicker. n. 3. a snickering laugh. Also, snigger. [1685 95; of expressive orig.] * * * …   Universalium

  • snicker — 1. noun /ˈsnɪk.ə(ɹ),ˈsnɪkɚ/ A stifled or broken laugh 2. verb /ˈsnɪk.ə(ɹ),ˈsnɪkɚ/ To emit a snicker stifled or broken laugh …   Wiktionary

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